Kindle Lock Screen can now display book covers

The Verge:

Amazon Kindle owners can now set the lockscreen image to the cover of the book they’re reading. The long overdue Display Cover feature, first spotted by Engadget, was previously only available after jailbreaking your device (and a popular motivator to do so). Amazon says that it works with “most books, magazines, comics, and Manga.”

I’m not sure what the hold-up was – some kind of competitor’s patent or just laziness or whatever – but as someone who has been waiting for this feature for over 10 years now, I’d just like to say: fuckin FINALLY.

I’ve been reading a lot more books over the last couple of months. Physical books, I mean. I think this is partly A) coming out of baby/pandemic brain-fog and B) I’d forgotten how lovely it is to hold a physical book. Every time you see your book, every time you open it, every time you turn a page with it, you increase your connection to it. A well-beaten book is a well-loved book that’s been with you for a while.

Opening the Kindle and seeing a generic screen saver gives you absolutely nothing. It’s not cementing my relationship to the form or the content. This isn’t helped by the fact that the Kindle turns on immediately drops you where you left off with no indication of whether you’re near the end of the book or just getting started. Like getting dropped in an unfamiliar place with no map. You just have to keep going forward and eventually you’ll reach somewhere. It’s a handy feature, for sure, but my dumb lizard-brain gets something from the physicality of being able to feel where I am in a book. The Kindle’s attempt to address this – putting the % completed in the corner just fills me with anxiety. Kind of like the inverse of watching a phone battery percentage trickling down, why amn’t I making progress in this goddamn book?!

Spotify completely changed my connection to music (I could probably tell you the name of every song on every album I’ve physically owned - these days I couldn’t even describe the cover of albums I love that I’ve only listened to on Spotify), the Kindle changed my connection to the books I read. It’s not unusual for me to finish a book and not be able to tell you the name of the author. Hopefully for the sake of my already-overflowing bookshelves, this will draw me back to the Kindle as a device for reading again and my physical to-read pile (here’s a photo from last month - yikes) won’t grow any more.

75 Artists, 7 Questions, One Very Bad Year - The New York Times →

Trent Reznor, answering the question of what art he’s turned to during the lockdown:

I’ve stumbled into the world of YouTube tutorials for various bits of musical gear. I’ve really found some comfort in curling up with a nice long video of someone demonstrating an obscure guitar pedal or synth at length. I’m usually watching and forgetting all information simultaneously but it feels like some kind of accomplishment.

Same, Trent. Same.

We Have to Grieve Our Last Good Days - The Atlantic →

This hit hard.

Sleep Around Before You Marry An Argument - essaying →

All the best essays are about the “why” and not the “who”. This is a great introduction to the idea of reading around a subject.

HANIA RANI — F MAJOR on Vimeo →

This is lovely but also really sort of makes me want to watch the OA again?

LEGO White Noise - Spotify →

A 7-hour album of LEGO ASMR might not be your cup of tea, but it’s exactly what I need right now.

Max Richter: Tiny Desk (Home) Concert - YouTube →

Just lovely. I really want a piano and a lovely sleepy dog to listen to me play piano.

Halt and Catch Fire Syllabus - Halt and Catch Fire Syllabus →

This site features a curriculum developed around the television series, Halt and Catch Fire (2014-2017), a fictional narrative about people working in tech during the 1980s-1990s.

I can think of few TV shows that deserve a syllabus like this. I can’t wait to dive into it.

From Cover to Cover | Jenny Volvovski →

This lady redesigns book covers after she reads them. I love this idea.

Billie Eilish: Same Interview, The Fourth Year →

For the last four years, Vanity Fair have been doing an interview with Billy Eilish where they ask her the same questions each year year. They first caught her in 2017, right before she blew up, so it’s amazing to watch the changes as she’s become one of the biggest pop stars in the world.